Weed Population Assessment in Wheat at Central Highlands of Ethiopia
American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry
Volume 7, Issue 1, January 2019, Pages: 17-22
Received: Dec. 1, 2018; Accepted: Jan. 10, 2019; Published: Feb. 13, 2019
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Authors
Shugute Addisu, Department of Crop Protection, Ethiopia Institute of Agricultural Research, Debre Zeit Agricultural Research Center, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia
Zahara Mohammed, Department of Crop Protection, Ethiopia Institute of Agricultural Research, Debre Zeit Agricultural Research Center, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia
Gebre Kidan Feleke, Department of Crop Protection, Ethiopia Institute of Agricultural Research, Debre Zeit Agricultural Research Center, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Study was conducted on Weed Population Assessment in Wheat at Adea, Gimbichu, Minjar shenkora, Akaki, Boro and Lume Districts in Central Highlands of Ethiopia during, 2014/15 main cropping season to determine the distribution of weed species in wheat growing areas of central highlands of Ethiopia and to record the weed infestation level on wheat crop production. Depending on the area coverage of Wheat in each Districts seven to three kebeles, again in each kebele six to four from Wheat fields samples were taken using 0.5 x 0.5m quderate and GPS instrument. The frequency, abundance and dominance regarding different aspects of weeds were calculated. The result revealed that 45 weed species belonging to 33 families as weeds of wheat for each species was calculated. The 5 major families based on number of taxa were: Poaceae (14), Asteraceae (7), three species each under Polygonaceae and Solanaceae, and Papilionaceae (2), totally they contain 66% of the total weed flora. The most frequent, abundant and dominant weed species were found to be setaria pumila, Plantago lanceolata, Bromus pecpectinatus, Cyperus rotudus, Xanthium strumarium L. and Snowdenia polystachya. Greater than 60% similarity index of weed communities was registered across all locations sampled.
Keywords
Distribution, Districts, Importance, Weeds, Wheat Field
To cite this article
Shugute Addisu, Zahara Mohammed, Gebre Kidan Feleke, Weed Population Assessment in Wheat at Central Highlands of Ethiopia, American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry. Vol. 7, No. 1, 2019, pp. 17-22. doi: 10.11648/j.ajaf.20190701.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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