Functional Characterization of a WD-Repeat Protein Gene (OsWD1) in Rice
American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry
Volume 6, Issue 2, March 2018, Pages: 18-27
Received: Apr. 7, 2018; Accepted: Apr. 23, 2018; Published: May 11, 2018
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Authors
Siou-Luan He, Department of Agronomy, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan, R.O.C.; Institute of Plant Biology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.; Institute of Plant and Microbial Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.
Shin-Lon Ho, Department of Agronomy, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan, R.O.C.
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Abstract
A gene encoded WD-40 repeat protein (OsWD1) was isolated from rice cells to study the platform for protein-protein interactions in germinating seeds. The expression of OsWD1 was found to be specifically induced at 3 d of seed germination. By ectopic overexpressing (OsWD1-Ox) or RNA interference gene knockdown (OsWD1-Ri) of OsWD1, respectively. Results revealed that the rice seedlings and grain size were enhanced in OsWD1-Ox lines, but were reduced in OsWD1-Ri lines. Moreover, the expression of GA-inducible gene, OsEP3A, which was strongly induced in OsWD1-Ox lines during rice seed germination. By iodine staining in starch containing solid medium, the a-amylase activities were further enhanced in OsWD1-Ox lines regardless with or without exogenous GA in the medium. These results suggested that OsWD1 might acts as a platform for protein-protein interactions to regulate seedling and seed development in rice by a GA-dependent manner.
Keywords
Rice, OsWD1, Overexpression, Plant Height, Grain Size, Gibberellin Acid
To cite this article
Siou-Luan He, Shin-Lon Ho, Functional Characterization of a WD-Repeat Protein Gene (OsWD1) in Rice, American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry. Vol. 6, No. 2, 2018, pp. 18-27. doi: 10.11648/j.ajaf.20180602.11
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Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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