Effect of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Fertilizer Rates on Yield and Yield Components of Barley (Hordeum Vugarae L.) Varieties at Damot Gale District, Wolaita Zone, Ethiopia
American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry
Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2015, Pages: 271-275
Received: Apr. 23, 2015; Accepted: Dec. 10, 2015; Published: Dec. 22, 2015
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Authors
Mesfin Kassa, Soil science, Wolaita Sodo University, College of Agriculture, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia
Zemach Sorsa, Plant Breeding, Wolaita Sodo University, College of Agriculture, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia
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Abstract
A field experiment was conducted at Damot Gale District, Wolaita Zone, SNNPRS to evaluate the response of barely varieties to nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer application since the response varies from location to location due to several factors. Thus, there is a need to determine specific nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer requirement of specific variety. The barley varieties (HB1370 and Shage) were used as test crop and the experiment contained factorial combination of four levels of N/P (0/0, 23/10, 46/20, 69/30 kg ha-1) and was laid out in randomized complete block design with three replications. The results from this study indicated that nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer showed no significant effect on number of days to heading while number of fertile tillers, total biomass and yield were significantly increased by application of nitrogen and phosphorus. However, the effects of nitrogen and phosphorus were significant (P < 0.05) on plant height, spike length, number of seeds per spike and grain yield. In general, grain yield tended to be higher under NP 69/30 kg ha-1 treatment (2.02t/ha). In contrast, the lowest grain yield (0.86t/ha) was obtained from 0/0 NP treatment, although the interaction effects of nitrogen and phosphorus were significant on treatments with varieties and balanced amount of nitrogen and phosphorus. The future studies should articulate towards the studies involving more varieties, multi-location and additional rates of nitrogen and phosphorus applications, under diverse management practices such as research and farmer’s field’s conditions, which may facilitate fine-tuning of fertilizer recommendations.
Keywords
Fertilizer, Phenology, Growth, Yield
To cite this article
Mesfin Kassa, Zemach Sorsa, Effect of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Fertilizer Rates on Yield and Yield Components of Barley (Hordeum Vugarae L.) Varieties at Damot Gale District, Wolaita Zone, Ethiopia, American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 271-275. doi: 10.11648/j.ajaf.20150306.15
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