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Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy Analysis and Chemical Composition of Ngaoundere, Cameroon Honey
American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering
Volume 3, Issue 5, October 2015, Pages: 33-36
Received: Aug. 3, 2015; Accepted: Aug. 22, 2015; Published: Sep. 16, 2015
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Authors
Cheh Auguistine Awasum, Departmentof Veterinary Surgery and Radiology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria
Sandra Leila Monkam Fotzo, School of Veterinary Medicine and Sciences, University of Ngaoundere, Ngaoundere, Cameroon
Julius Awah Ndukum, School of Veterinary Medicine and Sciences, University of Ngaoundere, Ngaoundere, Cameroon
ChintemWilliams Denbon Genesis, Department of Biochemistry, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria
Andre Zoli, School of Veterinary Medicine and Sciences, University of Ngaoundere, Ngaoundere, Cameroon
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Abstract
The investigation was carried out to determine the possible chemical components and quantity of the component present in honey using GC-MS analysis. Traditionally the natural honey are used in the treatment of ulcers, wound healing, swells, asthma, cough, hyperacidity, leprosy, diuretic, antimicrobial, jaundice, diuretic activity, hypolipidemic effect, hepatoprotective activity and fever. In the present study, the honey has been subjected to GC-MS analysis. Fourteen chemical constituents have been identified, the major chemical constituents are 2, 4-Dimethyl-1-pentanol (9.23%), 3, 5-Dihydroxy-6-methyl-2, 3-dihydro-4H-pyran-4-one (8.91%), 2-Furancarboxaldehyde, 5-hydroxymethyl (36.02%), 2-Butoxyethyl acetate (11.11%). It could be concluded that the Ngaoundere, Cameroon honey contains various bioactive compounds.
Keywords
GC-MS Analysis, Ulcer, Chemical Component, Honey
To cite this article
Cheh Auguistine Awasum, Sandra Leila Monkam Fotzo, Julius Awah Ndukum, ChintemWilliams Denbon Genesis, Andre Zoli, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy Analysis and Chemical Composition of Ngaoundere, Cameroon Honey, American Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2015, pp. 33-36. doi: 10.11648/j.bio.20150305.11
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