Bridging Geo technology Competence Gaps among Kenyan Undergraduate Students: An Interdisciplinary GIS Training Model at Chuka University
International Journal of Education, Culture and Society
Volume 1, Issue 3, December 2016, Pages: 70-74
Received: Oct. 14, 2016; Accepted: Dec. 5, 2016; Published: Jan. 7, 2017
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Authors
Kibetu Dickson Kinoti, Department of Arts and Humanities, Chuka University, Chuka, Kenya
Murungi Michael Muchai, Department of Geography, Turkana Boys High School, Turkana, Kenya
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Abstract
21st Century scholars are presented with opportunities to develop careers in emerging technological niche markets. Occupations and industries are also coaching for graduates with technological skills and sectoral market competencies. This situation calls for the utilization of technologies and market oriented models to train graduates on the skills, knowledge and abilities essential for employability. Geospatial niche jobs are fast growing labour markets in the world today and require graduates with interdisciplinary knowledge, Geo technology competences, creativity, problem-solving and computing skills. The objective of this paper is to share on the achievements of an innovative training model used by the author to equip multi disciplinary undergraduate students at Chuka University with relevant geospatial technical competencies. It was found that the use of interdisciplinary Geo technology based training approach cannot only bridge gaps on geo technical competency skills but also enhance interpersonal effectiveness skills and academic competencies as well.
Keywords
Employability, Competency, Creativity, Geospatial Skills, Interdisciplinary
To cite this article
Kibetu Dickson Kinoti, Murungi Michael Muchai, Bridging Geo technology Competence Gaps among Kenyan Undergraduate Students: An Interdisciplinary GIS Training Model at Chuka University, International Journal of Education, Culture and Society. Vol. 1, No. 3, 2016, pp. 70-74. doi: 10.11648/j.ijecs.20160103.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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