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Comparison Between Plethysmometer and Caliper Methods to Monitor Lesion-Size Induced by Leishmania major Infection in BALB/c Mouse Experimental Model
Animal and Veterinary Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2015, Pages: 179-185
Received: Dec. 15, 2015; Accepted: Dec. 25, 2015; Published: Jan. 8, 2016
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Authors
Hanene Attia, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, LR11IPT02, Laboratory of Transmission, Control and Immunobiology of Infections (LTCII), Tunis-Belvédère, Tunisia; Université Tunis El Manar, Tunis, Tunisia
Aymen Bali, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, LR11IPT02, Laboratory of Transmission, Control and Immunobiology of Infections (LTCII), Tunis-Belvédère, Tunisia; Université Tunis El Manar, Tunis, Tunisia
Rabiaa M. Sghaier, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, LR11IPT02, Laboratory of Transmission, Control and Immunobiology of Infections (LTCII), Tunis-Belvédère, Tunisia; Université Tunis El Manar, Tunis, Tunisia
Pablo A. Leon Martinez, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, LR11IPT02, Laboratory of Transmission, Control and Immunobiology of Infections (LTCII), Tunis-Belvédère, Tunisia; Université Tunis El Manar, Tunis, Tunisia
Ghada Mkannez, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, LR11IPT02, Laboratory of Transmission, Control and Immunobiology of Infections (LTCII), Tunis-Belvédère, Tunisia; Université Tunis El Manar, Tunis, Tunisia
Chiraz Atri, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, LR11IPT02, Laboratory of Transmission, Control and Immunobiology of Infections (LTCII), Tunis-Belvédère, Tunisia; Université Tunis El Manar, Tunis, Tunisia
Khaled Chourabi, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, LR11IPT02, Laboratory of Transmission, Control and Immunobiology of Infections (LTCII), Tunis-Belvédère, Tunisia; Université Tunis El Manar, Tunis, Tunisia
Fatma Z. Guerfali, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, LR11IPT02, Laboratory of Transmission, Control and Immunobiology of Infections (LTCII), Tunis-Belvédère, Tunisia; Université Tunis El Manar, Tunis, Tunisia
Dhafer Laouini, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, LR11IPT02, Laboratory of Transmission, Control and Immunobiology of Infections (LTCII), Tunis-Belvédère, Tunisia; Université Tunis El Manar, Tunis, Tunisia
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Abstract
In several parasitological diseases, as for leishmaniasis, measurement of the size of cutaneous lesions, which develop at the site of parasite inoculation in animal models, are the most commonly used index to assess disease progression, to compare parasites pathogenicity or virulence and to determine the effects of drug treatment and immunotherapies. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of two measurement tools i.e., the caliper and the plethysmometer to refine the lesion size determination. Our findings showed that the use of plethysmometer produced higher correlation with the importance of the lesion mass at experimental endpoints. These findings suggest that, for better differentiation in drug monitoring or Leishmania (L. ) strains’ virulence and pathogenicity, plethysmometer method is more sensitive to detect parasite-induced swelling and lesions differences at the end of experimental protocols when lesion size is important but caliper is more indicated for small lesions.
Keywords
Leishmania major, BALB/c Experimental Model, Lesion Size, Caliper, Plethysmometer
To cite this article
Hanene Attia, Aymen Bali, Rabiaa M. Sghaier, Pablo A. Leon Martinez, Ghada Mkannez, Chiraz Atri, Khaled Chourabi, Fatma Z. Guerfali, Dhafer Laouini, Comparison Between Plethysmometer and Caliper Methods to Monitor Lesion-Size Induced by Leishmania major Infection in BALB/c Mouse Experimental Model, Animal and Veterinary Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 179-185. doi: 10.11648/j.avs.20150306.16
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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