Preservation of Genetic Diversity of the Asian Native Goats
Animal and Veterinary Sciences
Volume 5, Issue 5, September 2017, Pages: 69-72
Received: Aug. 2, 2017; Accepted: Aug. 23, 2017; Published: Sep. 22, 2017
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Authors
Takeshi Honda, Food Resources Education and Research Center, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Kobe University, Hyogo, Japan
Mayu Shibano, Food Resources Education and Research Center, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Kobe University, Hyogo, Japan
Hirokazu Matsumoto, Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Department of Animal Science, School of Agriculture, Tokai University, Kumamoto, Japan
Shinji Sasazaki, Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan
Kenji Oyama, Food Resources Education and Research Center, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Kobe University, Hyogo, Japan
Hideyuki Mannen, Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan
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Abstract
Using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the relative importance of 10 subpopulations of Asian native goats in preserving genetic diversity was investigated. Analysis of prioritizing by removal of subpopulations identified the subpopulations of Mongolia (MGL), Myanmar (MYA), Cambodian plains (CAM_P), India (IND), and Philippine (PHI) as genetically important subpopulations because their removal resulted in a 6.38% reduction of expected heterozygosity. The removal of the remaining five subpopulations resulted in a 1.45% increase. Likewise, analysis using the core set method identified five subpopulations (MGL, MYA, CAM_P, IND, and PHI) as genetically important subpopulations. Among these five subpopulations, the IND was most important because of low molecular coancestry within itself and between the other subpopulations. The subpopulations of Cambodian mountainous (CAM_M) and Vietnam (VIE) were also considered to be important in this analysis. Based on these two investigations, we concluded that MGL, MYA, CAM_P, IND, and PHI are essential, and that CAM_M and VIE are worth preserving.
Keywords
Capra Hircus, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism, Molecular Coancestry, Expected Heterozygosity, Core Set Method
To cite this article
Takeshi Honda, Mayu Shibano, Hirokazu Matsumoto, Shinji Sasazaki, Kenji Oyama, Hideyuki Mannen, Preservation of Genetic Diversity of the Asian Native Goats, Animal and Veterinary Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2017, pp. 69-72. doi: 10.11648/j.avs.20170505.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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