Growth of Different Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Strains in Cell Lines from Origin of Lymphoid Leukosis Tumors
Animal and Veterinary Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 2, March 2015, Pages: 46-50
Received: Oct. 18, 2014; Accepted: Nov. 3, 2014; Published: Feb. 28, 2015
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Authors
Ahmed Hassan, Department of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Agriculture, Iwate University, 3-18-8, Ueda, Morioka, 020-8550, Japan; Department of Poultry diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, 71526, Egypt
Mostafa Shahata, Department of Poultry diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, 71526, Egypt
Elrefaie Refaie, Department of Poultry diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, 71526, Egypt
Ragab Ibrahim, Department of Poultry diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, 71526, Egypt
Jun Sasaki, Department of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Agriculture, Iwate University, 3-18-8, Ueda, Morioka, 020-8550, Japan
Masanubu Goryo, Department of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Agriculture, Iwate University, 3-18-8, Ueda, Morioka, 020-8550, Japan
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Abstract
Growth and propagation of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) in chicken embryo is time consuming and costly, and an appropriate serological test is required to detect and identify IBDV strains, therefore, a suitable cell lines in which different IBDV strains can grow well has been needed. The aim of the present work was to study the growth of different IBDV strains in cell lines from lymphoid leukosis tumors using histopathological staining, indirect immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopic examination. In conclusion, cell lines from origin of lymphoid leukosis tumors; LSCC-BK3 and LSCC-CU10 are suitable for growth and propagation of different IBDV strains. IBDV strains resulted into histopathological lesions of variable severity differ according to the patho-type of IBDV and time after virus inoculation. Indirect immunofluorescent test could be used for detection and differentiation of IBDV strains inoculated into cell lines from origin of lymphoid leukosis tumors. Trials of immunohistochemistry technique for detection of different IBDV strains in cell lines, were unsuccessful. Using transmission electron microscopy, IBDV particles could be detected in all infected cell lines.
Keywords
Infectious Bursal Disease Virus, Cell Lines, Histopathological Staining, Immunohistochemistry, Immunofluorescence
To cite this article
Ahmed Hassan, Mostafa Shahata, Elrefaie Refaie, Ragab Ibrahim, Jun Sasaki, Masanubu Goryo, Growth of Different Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Strains in Cell Lines from Origin of Lymphoid Leukosis Tumors, Animal and Veterinary Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 2, 2015, pp. 46-50. doi: 10.11648/j.avs.20150302.13
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