Degummed Crude Canola Oil Supplementation Affects Fat Depot Melting Points in Purebred and First-Cross Merino Sheep
Animal and Veterinary Sciences
Volume 2, Issue 3, May 2014, Pages: 75-80
Accepted: Apr. 22, 2014; Published: Apr. 30, 2014
Views 3095      Downloads 140
Authors
Aaron Ross Flakemore, Animal Science and Genetics, Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture, School of Land and Food, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 54 Sandy Bay, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
Peter David McEvoy, Animal Science and Genetics, Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture, School of Land and Food, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 54 Sandy Bay, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
Razaq Oladimeji Balogun, Coprice Feeds, PO Box 104 Cobden, Victoria 3266, Australia
Bunmi Sherifat Malau-Aduli, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine, Health and Molecular Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
Peter Nichols, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Food Futures Flagship, Division of Marine and Atmospheric Research, G.P.O. Box 1538, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
Aduli Enoch Othniel Malau-Aduli, Animal Science and Genetics, Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture, School of Land and Food, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 54 Sandy Bay, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia; School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Health and Molecular Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that degummed crude canola oil (DCCO) will lower fat melting points (FMP) of both visceral and subcutaneous fats in lambs. Twenty-four lambs comprising purebred and first-cross Merino progeny from Dorset, White Suffolk and Merino sires mated to purebred Merino ewes were supplemented with varying levels of DCCO over a nine-week period. The experimental treatment groups were: Control (1kg plain wheat-based pellets only), Medium (500g plain wheat-based pellets + 500g wheat-based pellets containing DCCO), and High (1kg wheat-based pellets containing DCCO at a concentration of 50ml/kg) supplementation levels. The flock comprised eight wether and ewe lambs per treatment. However, at the end of the trial, four Merino ewes were retained in the flock for breeding purposes, while the remaining twenty lambs were slaughtered in a commercial abattoir. Visceral fat samples were taken from the kidney region and subcutaneous fat samples were taken from the Longissimus dorsi muscle. FMP was determined using temperature slip point methodology in the laboratory. DCCO had significant effects on the FMP of both subcutaneous (p 0.0002) and visceral (p<0.0001) fats, with the lowest FMP achieved at high levels of supplementation in both fat depots. Significant sire breed differences (p<0.0001) were also detected in which Dorset-sired progeny had the highest melting points in both fat depots. The results of this study indicate that within fat depots, DCCO supplementation produced softer fats with lower melting points, suggesting potentially healthier fats likely to contain higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids.
Keywords
Degummed Crude Canola Oil, Fat Melting Point, Subcutaneous Fat, Visceral Fat, Sire Breed
To cite this article
Aaron Ross Flakemore, Peter David McEvoy, Razaq Oladimeji Balogun, Bunmi Sherifat Malau-Aduli, Peter Nichols, Aduli Enoch Othniel Malau-Aduli, Degummed Crude Canola Oil Supplementation Affects Fat Depot Melting Points in Purebred and First-Cross Merino Sheep, Animal and Veterinary Sciences. Vol. 2, No. 3, 2014, pp. 75-80. doi: 10.11648/j.avs.20140203.14
References
[1]
Smith SB, Yang AJ, Larsen TW, Tume RK: Positional analysis of triacylglycerols from bovine adipose tissue lipids varying in degree of unsaturation. Lipids 1998, 33:197-207.
[2]
Yang A, Larsen TW, Smith SB, Tume RK: Delta (9) desaturase activity in bovine subcutaneous adipose tissue of different fatty acid composition. Lipids 1999, 34:971-978.
[3]
Webb EC, O'Neill HA: The animal fat paradox and meat quality. Meat Sci 2008, 80:28-36.
[4]
Wood JD, Enser M, Fisher AV, Nute GR, Sheard PR, Richardson RI, Hughes SI, Whittington FM: Fat deposition, fatty acid composition and meat quality: A review. Meat Sci 2008, 78:343-358.
[5]
Wood JD, Enser M, Fisher AV, Nute GR, Whittington FM, Richardson RI: Effects of diets on fatty acids and meat quality. Options Mediterraneennes Serie A, Seminaires Mediterraneens 2005, 133-141.
[6]
Calder PC: n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, inflammation, and inflammatory diseases. Am J Clin Nutr 2006, 83:1505S-1519S.
[7]
Hess BW, Moss GE, Rule DC: A decade of developments in the area of fat supplementation research with beef cattle and sheep. J Anim Sci 2008, 86:E188-204.
[8]
Bessa RJB, Portugal PV, Mendes IA, Santos-Silva J: Effect of lipid supplementation on growth performance, carcass and meat quality and fatty acid composition of intramuscular lipids of lambs fed dehydrated lucerne or concentrate. Livest Prod Sci 2005, 96:185-194.
[9]
Mills SC, Cook LJ, Scott TW, Nestel PJ: Effect of dietary0fat supplementation on compositional and positional distribution of fatty-acids in ruminant and porcine glycerides. Lipids 1976, 11:49-60.
[10]
Santos-Silva J, Mendes IA, Portugal PV, Bessa RJB: Effect of particle size and soybean oil supplementation on growth performance, carcass and meat quality and fatty acid composition of intramuscular lipids of lambs. Livest Prod Sci 2004, 90:79-88.
[11]
Szumacher-Strabel M, Cieslak A, Nowakowska A, Potkanski A: Feeding plant and fish oils to improve polyunsaturated fat concentrations in intramuscular, perirenal and subcutaneous lambs' fat. Zuchtungskunde 2009, 81:133-140.
[12]
Wachira AM, Sinclair LA, Wilkinson RG, Enser M, Wood JD, Fisher AV: Effects of dietary fat source and breed on the carcass composition, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid and conjugated linoleic acid content of sheep meat and adipose tissue. Brit J Nutr 2002, 88:697-709.
[13]
SAS Institute: Statistical Analysis System. In SAS Institute, Version 9.2 Cary, NC, USA; 2009.
[14]
Golshan-Zoroofi M, Shahryar HA, Chekaniazar V, Chekaniazar S: Effect of different oil sources on muscle fatty acid composition and serum lipoproteins levels in Sarabi beef steer. Int J Anim Vet Adv 2011, 3:379-385.
[15]
Peng YS, Brown MA, Wu JP, Liu Z: Different oilseed supplements alter fatty acid composition of different adipose tissues of adult ewes. Meat Sci 2010, 85:542-549.
[16]
Radunz AE, Wickersham LA, Loerch SC, Fluharty FL, Reynolds CK, Zerby HN: Effects of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on fatty acid composition in muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue of lambs. J Anim Sci 2009, 87:4082-4091.
[17]
Bas P, Morand-Fehr P: Effect of nutritional factors on fatty acid composition of lamb fat deposits. Livest Prod Sci 2000, 64:61-79.
[18]
Busboom JR, Miller GJ, Field RA, Crouse JD, Riley ML, Nelms GE, Ferrell CL: Characteristics of fat from heavy ram and wether lambs. J Anim Sci 1981, 52:83-92.
[19]
Miller GJ, Kunsman JE, Field RA: Characteristics of soft subcutaneous fat in ram lambs fed corn and corn-silage diets. J Food Sci 1980, 45:279-&.
[20]
Malau-Aduli AEO, Edriss MA, Siebert BD, Bottema CDK, Pitchford WS: Breed differences and genetic parameters for melting point, marbling score and fatty acid composition of lot-fed cattle. J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr 2000, 83:95-105.
[21]
Pitchford WS, Deland MPB, Siebert BD, Malau-Aduli AEO, Bottema CDK: Genetic variation in fatness and fatty acid composition of crossbred cattle. J Anim Sci 2002, 80:2825-2832.
[22]
Siebert BD, Deland MP, Pitchford WS: Breed differences in the fatty acid composition of subcutaneous and intramuscular lipid of early and late maturing, grain-finished cattle. Aust J Agric Res 1996, 47:943-952.
[23]
Fogarty NM, Safari E, Taylor PJ, Murray W: Genetic parameters for meat quality and carcass traits and their correlation with wool traits in Australian Merino sheep. Aust J Agric Res 2003, 54:715-722.
[24]
Wiese SC, Pethick DW, Milton JTB, Davidson RH, McIntyre BL, D'Souza DN: Effect of teeth eruption on growth performance and meat quality of sheep. Aust J Exp Agric 2005, 45:509-515.
[25]
Barwick SA, Thwaites CJ: Sheep carcasses and their appraisal. 1. Characteristics of commercial Australian lamb and mutton. Aust J Exp Agric 1980, 20:32-39.
[26]
Doreau M, Bauchart D, Chilliard Y: Enhancing fatty acid composition of milk and meat through animal feeding. Anim Prod Sci 2011, 51:19-29.
[27]
McPhee MJ, Hopkins DL, Pethick DW: Intramuscular fat levels in sheep muscle during growth. Aust J Exp Agric 2008, 48:904-909.
[28]
Crouse JD, Busboom JR, Field RA, Ferrell CL: The effects of breed, diet, sex, location and slaughter weight on lamb growth, carcass composition and meat flavor. J Anim Sci 1981, 53:376-386.
[29]
Horcada A, Beriain MJ, Purroy A, Lizaso G, Chasco J: Effect of sex on meat quality of Spanish lamb breeds (Lacha and Rasa Aragonesa). Anim Sci 1998, 67:541-547.
[30]
Treacher T: Effect of animal and nutritional factors and nutrition on lamb meat quality. Cahiers Options Mediterraneennes 2000, 52:75-86.
[31]
Warriss PD: Meat science: An introductory text (2nd Ed.); CABI Series, CABI, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, UK; 2009.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186