Identification of Fungal Species Associated with Contaminants and Pathogenicity on Tamarindus Indica Fruits from Maiduguri Monday Market, Borno State Nigeria
Plant
Volume 5, Issue 2, March 2017, Pages: 36-41
Received: Jan. 18, 2017; Accepted: Feb. 4, 2017; Published: Mar. 1, 2017
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Authors
Wante Solomon Peter, Department of Biological Sciences, Federal University, Kashere, Gombe, Nigeria
Oamen Henry Patrick, Department of Plant Biology and Biotechnology, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria
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Abstract
A study of Tamarindus indica fruits rot was carried out in Maiduguri Monday Market located in The North- Eastern Nigeria. Tamarind indica fruits are showing sign of spoilage and fresh one were collected to ascertain the presence of contaminant and pathogenicity test was carry out to confirm further the fungal pathogen associated with fruits rot. We assessed the effects of temperature on the growth of colony diameter of the isolate. In vitro radial growth of each species of the fungal isolates (Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus stolonifer, Ulocladium chartarum, Penicillium chrysogenum and Penicillium citrinum) was measured at 37°C, 42°C, 47°C, 52°C, and 57°C for three weeks. Optimal growth for all the five-species occurred at 37°C, with slower growth at 47°C and 52°C. At 57°C, values of colony diameter reduced significantly for all the fungal isolates observed, however, there was a close relationship in values of colony diameter obtained for all the fungal species at 57°C. After three weeks, fungal colonies were digitally photomicrographed and colony opacity was assessed.
Keywords
Tamarindus Indica, Sterilized and Unsterilized, Colony and Fungi
To cite this article
Wante Solomon Peter, Oamen Henry Patrick, Identification of Fungal Species Associated with Contaminants and Pathogenicity on Tamarindus Indica Fruits from Maiduguri Monday Market, Borno State Nigeria, Plant. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2017, pp. 36-41. doi: 10.11648/j.plant.20170502.12
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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