The Agricultural Environment's Effect on the Deterioration of the Archaeological Sites Applied on Atfiyah's Sarabium Archaeological Site – Egypt
International Journal of Archaeology
Volume 5, Issue 1, January 2017, Pages: 6-13
Received: Jul. 10, 2016; Accepted: Oct. 17, 2016; Published: Apr. 15, 2017
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Authors
Rabea Radi Abdel Kader, Restoration Department, Faculty of Archaeology, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
Shaimaa Sayed Mohamed El-Sayed, Restoration Department, Faculty of Archaeology, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
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Abstract
The Agricultural Environment has a severe effect on the deterioration of the archaeological sites, it causes many deterioration phenomena to these sites, most of them are biodeterioration and the others are physio – chemical deterioration. Sarabium archaeological site located in Atfiyah's center – Egypt, it belonged to 26th dynasty, the site suffers from the agricultural environment's effect because it is very near from the fields in the area (100 meter approx. far only). The most effective factor of deterioration is the groundwater which affects badly on the deterioration of the building materials there, many microorganisms grow on lime stone carved coffins and ruins, they secret organic compounds which react with lime stone and turn it to soluble salts, the groundwater comes from the fields and contains many salts which dissolve in it and rise with the capillary system to the building materials not only this effect, but also the intensive growth of weeds in the site. This research aims to study the agricultural environment's effect on the deterioration of the archaeological sites with an application on Atfiyah's Sarabium archaeological site – Giza -Egypt.
Keywords
Sarabium Archaeological Site, Ground Water, Microorganisms, Limestone, Weeds and Salts
To cite this article
Rabea Radi Abdel Kader, Shaimaa Sayed Mohamed El-Sayed, The Agricultural Environment's Effect on the Deterioration of the Archaeological Sites Applied on Atfiyah's Sarabium Archaeological Site – Egypt, International Journal of Archaeology. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2017, pp. 6-13. doi: 10.11648/j.ija.20170501.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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Mission égypto-française d’Atfih, 'Atfih, la nécropole des vaches sacrées (mission 2008), Institut d' Egyptologie Francois Daumas, Universite Paul Valery, France, 2008.
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Nick A. Cutler, Heather A. Viles, Samin Ahmad, Stephen McCabe, Bernard J. Smith, Algal ‘greening’ and the conservation of stone heritage structures, Science of the Total Environment 442, (2013), P: 153.
[3]
Shaimaa Sayed Mohamed El-Sayed Mahgoub, ' Evaluation of Wild and Domestic Trees and Plants Hazards, their Role in the Deterioration of Archaeological Buildings Ruins, Methods of Treatment and Assessment of these Hazards Applied on a Chosen Historical Building and Site ', PhD thesis, Restoration department, Faculty of Archaeology, Cairo University, Egypt, 2015/2016.
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