Traditional Ecological Knowledge for Climate Change Assessment and Rainfall Prediction: A Case of Adami Tulu Jido Kombolcha District, Oromia Region, Ethiopia
International Journal of Natural Resource Ecology and Management
Volume 5, Issue 2, June 2020, Pages: 43-48
Received: Mar. 14, 2020; Accepted: Mar. 27, 2020; Published: Apr. 17, 2020
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Authors
Martha Kidemu, Climate Change Research, Ethiopian Environment and Forest Research Institute (EEFRI), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; African Center of Excellence for Climate Smart Agriculture and Biodiversity Conservation, Haramaya University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia
Martha Gebreyesus, Climate Change Research, Ethiopian Environment and Forest Research Institute (EEFRI), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Mihiret Semere, Climate Change Research, Ethiopian Environment and Forest Research Institute (EEFRI), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Adefires Worku, Climate Change Research, Ethiopian Environment and Forest Research Institute (EEFRI), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Agena Anjulo, Climate Change Research, Ethiopian Environment and Forest Research Institute (EEFRI), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Data on environmental problems of the area, local manifestations of climate change, climate change coping strategies, rainfall prediction mechanisms and their threats were collected in three systematically selected administrative units of the study area using focus group discussion, key informant interview and household (HH) survey from May to June, 2017. Focus group (FG) discussion that participate youth, elders, women, religion and tradition leaders and experts with average members of 15 was organized at each administrative units. Sample key informants (KI) were selected by the focus group members by setting criteria to get deep information. HH survey was conducted from randomly selected 92 HHs samples determined by Kothari (2004). Qualitative data analysis method was used to summarize the information. Results showed that environmental problems in the area are directly or indirectly related to climate. And the communities rely on their indigenous rainfall prediction using meteorological, astronomic and animal behavioral indicators. The main indicators are: wind direction, appearance and shape of cloud, star pattern, moon’s appearance, cattle behavior, chirping of bird, bee’s migration, and color of lake and appearance of rainbow. The study also depicted that most (85%) of the communities heavily rely on the indigenous knowledge for planning agricultural activities or early warnings for preparedness. However, it has been threatened due to critics by religious people, lack of trust of young generation, degradation of the indicators and lack of documentation. There is need for careful evaluation and enhancement for social-ecological resilience of the vulnerable communities.
Keywords
TEK, Indigenous Knowledge, Rainfall Prediction, Climate Change, Indicators
To cite this article
Martha Kidemu, Martha Gebreyesus, Mihiret Semere, Adefires Worku, Agena Anjulo, Traditional Ecological Knowledge for Climate Change Assessment and Rainfall Prediction: A Case of Adami Tulu Jido Kombolcha District, Oromia Region, Ethiopia, International Journal of Natural Resource Ecology and Management. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2020, pp. 43-48. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnrem.20200502.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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