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The Psychological Distress, Subjective Burden and Affiliate Stigma among Caregivers of People with Mental Illness in Amanuel Specialized Mental Hospital
American Journal of Applied Psychology
Volume 4, Issue 2, March 2015, Pages: 35-49
Received: Mar. 20, 2015; Accepted: Apr. 3, 2015; Published: Apr. 14, 2015
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Author
Kahsay Weldeslasie Hailemariam, Department of Psychology, College of Social Sciences and Languages, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia
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Abstract
The researcher employed mixed approach with cross sectional research design in order to collect comprehensive data from caregivers of people with mental illness at a time. Most of the caregivers developed from moderate to severe psychological distress, subjective burden and stigma. Most of the participant’s variables don’t have statistically significant difference in experiencing of psychological distress and subjective burden on caregivers. But, patients’ type of disorder brings statistically significant difference in creating psychological distress and subjective burden on caregivers (t=2.28, df =173, p<0.05 and t=2.64, df, =173, p<0.05) respectively. In relation to the care giving burden, average mean score of caregivers of people with psychotic disorder were found to be 46.83 and the average mean score of participants who have been giving care for the mood patients were found to be 43.92. With regards to the psychological distress, the average mean score of participants who give care for psychotic patients and mood patients were found to be 27.58 and 25.66 respectively. There is also significant relationship between care giving burden and psychological distress (r = 0.34, p< 0.01), care giving burden and affiliate stigma (r = 0.335, p< 0.01), psychological distress and affiliate stigma (r = 0.23, p<0.01), time spent on care giving and care giving burden (r = -0.205, p<0.01). Generally, having family members with mental illness exposed caregiver to have psychological distress, subjective burden and affiliate stigma.
Keywords
Psychological Distress, Subjective Burden, Affiliate Stigma, Caregivers
To cite this article
Kahsay Weldeslasie Hailemariam, The Psychological Distress, Subjective Burden and Affiliate Stigma among Caregivers of People with Mental Illness in Amanuel Specialized Mental Hospital, American Journal of Applied Psychology. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2015, pp. 35-49. doi: 10.11648/j.ajap.20150402.13
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