Incorporating Interactive Teaching Approaches in the Tertiary Science Classroom; Benefits, Challenges and Deterrents to Use in a Jamaican University
Science Journal of Education
Volume 2, Issue 5, October 2014, Pages: 146-151
Received: Sep. 22, 2014; Accepted: Oct. 10, 2014; Published: Oct. 20, 2014
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Authors
Cliff Kelvin Riley, College of Health Sciences, University of Technology, Kingston, Jamaica; Faculty of Humanities and Education, University of the West Indies (Mona campus) Kingston, Jamaica
Beverley Dawn Myers, Faculty of Science and Sport, University of Technology, Kingston, Jamaica; Faculty of Humanities and Education, University of the West Indies (Mona campus) Kingston, Jamaica
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Abstract
The extent to which lecturers utilise interactive teaching strategies in the tertiary science classrooms at a tertiary institution in Jamaica was investigated. Interactive strategies used, preferred strategy, frequency of use, perceived benefits to students, deterrents to use, and challenges faced with implementation were investigated. The sample comprised of 60 full-time science lecturers with a minimum undergraduate teaching load of 10 contact hours per week. The population comprised primarily of females (93.3%) with a mean age of 38.1 ± 3.67 years. The results show that teacher-led discussion (90%) and cooperative learning strategies (50%) were the most frequently used interactive teaching approaches employed by the lecturers while peer teaching was the least (8%). Further analysis of lecturers’ views of their teaching approach revealed that all lecturers facilitated in-class discussions, student-teacher interactions and questions from students at some point during their lectures. Preparation time (40%), increased workload (40%) and poor student participation (40%) were identified as the primary challenges faced while time restriction (90%) was the main deterrent to using interactive strategies by lecturers in the classroom. Despite this however, lecturers reported that interactive teaching strategies were explored and incorporated during their lectures in a bid to improve student comprehension, improve the learning environment, and build critical and lateral thinking skills. The results also suggest that curriculum scope and institutional policies did not impact negatively on the lecturers’ ability to incorporate interactive teaching strategies in their classroom.
Keywords
Interactive Teaching, Tertiary Science Classroom, Jamaican University, Benefits of Interactive Teaching
To cite this article
Cliff Kelvin Riley, Beverley Dawn Myers, Incorporating Interactive Teaching Approaches in the Tertiary Science Classroom; Benefits, Challenges and Deterrents to Use in a Jamaican University, Science Journal of Education. Vol. 2, No. 5, 2014, pp. 146-151. doi: 10.11648/j.sjedu.20140205.12
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