A Proposed Administrative Strategy for Community Accountability Based on the Effective Schools’ Quality Performance Standards in Jordan
Education Journal
Volume 8, Issue 3, May 2019, Pages: 125-133
Received: Apr. 24, 2019; Accepted: May 28, 2019; Published: Jun. 11, 2019
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Authors
Ziad Ahmed Twissi, War Child Organization UK, Jordan, Amman
Ikhlaif Al-Tarawneh, Faculty of Education, University of Jordan, Jordan, Amman
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Abstract
The study aimed at developing a blueprinted administrative strategy for community accountability having regard to the effective schools’ quality performance standards in Jordan. It was conducted on 90 heads of the educational councils in Jordan, who agreed to take part in the study during 2016 to 2017. The findings surfaced an urgent need for community accountability considering these standards from participants’’ view of points. Moreover, two domains of the community accountability scale; accountability responsiveness and incentives (rewards and penalties) were appeared at a critical level whilst eight domains; legislation, governance, accountability standards, resources, skills, and capacity building, planning and assessment, reporting and information sharing, as well as accountability ethics and morals, were revealed to be extremely urgent. Based on these results, it is found that an administrative strategy for community accountability based on quality standards of the schools’ effective performance was developed, refereed and recommended to be applied over several stages of time. the new strategy for community accountability consists of five components: 1. The overall framework of the strategy, 2. Planning for the implementation of the strategy, 3. Outreach and Capacity Building, 4. Practical and Operational Application, 5. Monitoring and assessment, and system responsiveness. Also, based on experts’ judgment, all components of the strategy were highly acknowledged as relevant for the proposed strategy implementation.
Keywords
Administrative Strategy, Community Accountability, Quality Standards, Effective School
To cite this article
Ziad Ahmed Twissi, Ikhlaif Al-Tarawneh, A Proposed Administrative Strategy for Community Accountability Based on the Effective Schools’ Quality Performance Standards in Jordan, Education Journal. Vol. 8, No. 3, 2019, pp. 125-133. doi: 10.11648/j.edu.20190803.16
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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