The Effect of ESP on Learning EFL Skills (A Case Study of Different Faculties at Red Sea University)
Education Journal
Volume 7, Issue 3, May 2018, Pages: 63-67
Received: Jul. 22, 2018; Accepted: Aug. 28, 2018; Published: Sep. 26, 2018
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Author
Nahid Alamin Ibrahim, Languages Department, Port Sudan Ahlia College, Port Sudan, Sudan
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Abstract
This study presents and examine the specific needs of English language ESP for students of different faculties at Red Sea University. The study was carried out in five faculties using descriptive analytical method to find out How, ESP plays a vital role in the learning process nowadays The statement of the problem is that: most of Sudanese university do not have any kind of readymade EAP materials designed by experts in the field of syllabus design. The EAP teachers compile the EAP materials by themselves. most of the students conceive that the compiled material by the English language instructors is inadequate in some ways and should be developed to become effective in classes. Students, also, see that the English language instruction does not help them to acquire vocational English efficiently and it should be improved to increase their learning capacity in that type of ESP The Questionnaire as a research tool was distributed to 100 respondents (male and female students) of five faculties and the data was collected and analyzed by using tables of percentages for each scale in this study. In addition to the teachers Interview. The findings of the study reveal that A/Limited use of ESP books as reference caused Insufficient ESP Competencies. B/ Drawbacks in ESP materials are due to the absence of needs analysis in the process of syllabus design C/ Many of ESP learners in Sudanese higher institutions are not aware of both their learning and target situation needs. The results of the investigation have revealed the following: 1/. the respondents need the four skills in learning ESP as academic purpose with the following ranking: listening, reading, writing, speaking conversely for the career purpose with these four skills. 2/. many of ESP learners in Sudanese higher institutions are not aware of both their learning and target situation needs. The study concluded with some recommendations. 1/. the importance of determining the English language for specific purposes based on the students need and thus designing the courses based on this analysis gathered. 2/. ESP courses which are taught in Sudanese universities should be tailored to the students’ specific needs.
Keywords
Red Sea University, ESP, SPSS analysis, Materials Designed, Learning Capacity
To cite this article
Nahid Alamin Ibrahim, The Effect of ESP on Learning EFL Skills (A Case Study of Different Faculties at Red Sea University), Education Journal. Vol. 7, No. 3, 2018, pp. 63-67. doi: 10.11648/j.edu.20180703.14
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Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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