Audre Lorde’s The Cancer Journals: Lorde’s Mastectomy as an Identity
English Language, Literature & Culture
Volume 1, Issue 2, July 2016, Pages: 5-12
Received: May 21, 2016; Accepted: Jun. 27, 2016; Published: Jul. 18, 2016
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Author
Ali Mohammad Alshhre, Department of English, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, King Khalid University, Mohayil City, Saudi Arabia
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Abstract
Mark Sherry, in “(Post) colonizing Disability,” defines disability differently and reconsiders it as an identity like race, religion, and gender: “it is an identity, with both social and personal dimensions, which may be associated with feelings of community, solidarity, and pride, or conversely, with feelings of difference, exclusion, and shame. It could be an identity that is based on identifying as someone who navigates the world in atypical ways,” [15] such as encountering some physical and attitudinal obstacles. This paper argues that feminist disability theory provides many ways to think about women’s disability and how their disability is considered as an identity and pride rather than something shameful or embarrassing in Audre Lorde’s The Cancer Journals. For example, After Lorde’s breast cancer surgery, she refuses having a breast prosthesis because she considers it as something against her identity and her body. She reflects, after mastectomy, how disability is in itself identity that is associated with her body. Moreover, her novel can be read to gain the experience that rather than accepting the breast prosthesis that makes people change their views in a society towards her and to avoid looking at her strangely, her disability as an identity and pride that makes her accept her temporary situation without having the breast prosthesis. Consequently, Lorde’s refusal for the breast prosthesis and to remain as she is signifies how important is it to keep her real identity in a society even if she faces negative attitudes or negative barriers.
Keywords
Colonialism, Medical Colonialism, Postcolonialism, Disability, Mastectomy, Prosthesis, Feminist Disability, Self-Power, Disability Pride
To cite this article
Ali Mohammad Alshhre, Audre Lorde’s The Cancer Journals: Lorde’s Mastectomy as an Identity, English Language, Literature & Culture. Vol. 1, No. 2, 2016, pp. 5-12. doi: 10.11648/j.ellc.20160102.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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