Parental Involvement as a Correlate of Academic Self-Efficacy of Secondary School Students
International Journal of Secondary Education
Volume 7, Issue 3, September 2019, Pages: 69-76
Received: Jun. 27, 2019; Accepted: Jul. 25, 2019; Published: Aug. 12, 2019
Views 148      Downloads 36
Authors
Dorothy Ebere Adimora, Educational Psychology Unit, Department of Educational Foundations, Faculty of Education, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria
Charity Neejide Onyishi, Educational Psychology Unit, Department of Educational Foundations, Faculty of Education, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria
Ucheaga Nonye Helen, Educational Psychology Unit, Department of Educational Foundations, Faculty of Education, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
This study explored the correlation between parental involvement and academic self-efficacy of secondary school students in Nsukka education zone, Enugu state, Nigeria. Six types of parental involvement and two levels of academic self-efficacy were explored. Two research questions and two null hypotheses guided the study. The study was designed as a cross-sectional correlational survey. From the population of 4,469 SSII student, a sample of 260 (122 male and 138 females) SSII students participated in the study. Academic self-efficacy scale (ASES) adapted and researcher-developed parental involvement scale (PIS) were used for data collection. The data was analyzed using Pearson’s product moment correlation coefficient to answer research questions, while linear and multiple regression analysis were used to test the null hypotheses at 0.05 level of significance. The result of the analyses shows a positive moderate relationship between parental involvement on academic self-efficacy. It further reveals a positive moderate relationship between parental involvement and academic self-efficacy of male and female students. Based on the findings of the study, it was recommended among others that; there should be programs in educational institutions, to educate parents on the importance of applying the types of parental involvement in training their children.
Keywords
Academic Achievement, Parental Involvement, Parenting, Self-Efficacy
To cite this article
Dorothy Ebere Adimora, Charity Neejide Onyishi, Ucheaga Nonye Helen, Parental Involvement as a Correlate of Academic Self-Efficacy of Secondary School Students, International Journal of Secondary Education. Vol. 7, No. 3, 2019, pp. 69-76. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsedu.20190703.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
Pintrich, P. R; Ronald W. M, & Robert, A. B (2003). Beyond cold conceptual change: The role of motivational beliefs classroom contextual factors in the process of conceptual change. Review of Educational Research, 63 (2). http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.3012/00346543063002167.
[2]
Bandura, A. (1977). Self-efficacy: Toward a unifying theory of behavior change. Psychological review, 84, 191-215.
[3]
Bandura, A. (1995). Self-efficacy in changing societies. New York: Cambridge university press.
[4]
Parajes, F. (2002). Self-efficacy beliefs in academic, settings. Review of education research. 66, 543.
[5]
Bandura, A (1997) Self-efficacy: The exercise of control. New York: W. H. Free and Company.
[6]
McGrew, K, S. (2008). Beyond IQ: Model of academic competence and motivation (MACM). https://www.slideshare.net/iapsych/macm-overview.
[7]
Ormond, S (2008) Motivating learners in open and distance learning: do we need a new theory of learner support?', Open Learning: The Journal of Open and Distance Learning, 23: 3, 159-170 To link to this Article: DOI: 10. 1080/02680510802419979.
[8]
Pajare, F & Schunk, D. H. (2001). Self-efficacy belief and school success: self-efficacy self- concept, and school achievement: In R. Riding & S. Rayn. (eds. ). Perception. London Ablex publishing. http://www.des.emory.edu/mfp/pajaresschunk2001.html
[9]
Schwarzer, R., & Hallum, S. (2008). Perceived teacher self-efficacy as a predictor of job stress and burnout: Mediation analyses. Applied Psychology, 57 (1), 152-171. http://www.sciepub.com/reference/46233
[10]
Bandura, A. (1993) Self-efficacy: Toward a unifying theory of behaviour change. Psychological review, 84, 191-215.
[11]
Kurumeh, L. (2006). Social group of students and academic performance: Journal of Education. University of Calabar, June 2001.
[12]
Adebayo, T. A. (2000). Comparative education. Ibadan: Oxford Press.
[13]
Nokali. E. N, Bachman, H. J & Votruba-Drzal, E. (2010). Parent involvement and children's academic and social development in elementary school. Journal of Child Development 81 (3), 988-1005. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2973328/
[14]
Afolabi, O. E. (2014). Parents’ involvement and psycho-educational development of learners with special educational needs (SENs): An empirical review. Romanian Journal of School Psychology, 7 (14), 7-31. https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=YIoAs8AAAAAJ&hl=en
[15]
Sigelman, C. K. & Shaffer, D. R. (1995). Developmental psychology: life span human development. Calif book/colenus.
[16]
Molly, Z. (2014) Teachers’ and parents’ perceptions of parental involvement on Inner City children’s academic success. Georgia Educational Research, 11 (1), 3. DOI: 10. 20429/ger. 2014. 11010. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/730e/283242457fc5f99f8ffa20e4769c4607908c. pdf.
[17]
Chows. Masa, R. &Tucker, J. (2013). The effects of parental involvement on academic performance of Ghanaian youth: Testing measurement and relationship using structural equation modeling. Children and Youth Services Review, 35 (12), 2020-2030. doi: 10. 1016/j. childyouth. 2013. 09. 0. Retrieved from https://csd.wustl.edu/publications/documents/wp13-15.pdf.content/uploads/2009/10/ajc_v10n2_147-167. pdf.
[18]
Epstein, J. L. (2005). Perspectives and previews on research and policy for school, family and community partnerships. In Booth, A & Dunn, J. (ed). Family-school links: how do they affect educational outcomes? Hillsdale, N, J. Erlbaum.
[19]
World health organization, (2017). Concept of gender. http://www.gender.gov.nz/redgd.isr/umic_edu/gender
[20]
Mirriam, W. (2016). Concept of gender. http://www.enm.wikipedia.org//gender
[21]
Jinks, J., & Morgan, V. "Children's perceived academic self-efficacy: An inventory scale, " The Clearing House, 72 (4), 1999, pp. 224-230
[22]
Crider, Goethals, Cavanaugh & Solomon. (2013). Gender differences in self-efficacy and academic performance among students of business administration. Journal of educational research, 39, 311-318.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186