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Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil of Belpharis linariifolia
International Journal of Science, Technology and Society
Volume 5, Issue 4, July 2017, Pages: 62-66
Received: Feb. 28, 2017; Accepted: Apr. 19, 2017; Published: Jun. 3, 2017
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Authors
Noha Ali Ibrahim, Chemistry Department, Omdurman Islamic University, Khartoum, Sudan
Safa Khalid Musa, Chemistry Department, Omdurman Islamic University, Khartoum, Sudan
Shima Mohammed Yassin, Chemistry Department, Omdurman Islamic University, Khartoum, Sudan
Nosiba Hashim Abuniama, Chemistry Department, Omdurman Islamic University, Khartoum, Sudan
Sufyan Awadalkareem, Chemistry Department, Omdurman Islamic University, Khartoum, Sudan; Medical Biochemistry Research Department, Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Research Institute, National Center for Research, Khartoum, Sudan
Alsiddig Osama, Chemistry Department, Omdurman Islamic University, Khartoum, Sudan
Mohamed N. Abdalaziz, Medical Biochemistry Research Department, Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Research Institute, National Center for Research, Khartoum, Sudan; Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, International University of Africa. Khartoum, Sudan
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Abstract
The study was aimed to investigate essential oil chemical composition and antimicrobial activities of essential oils extracted from seeds of Belpharis linariifolia. The oil was extracted according to the method described by Harborne (1984). and analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrophotometer (FTIR) and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) techniques to determine the chemical composition of the volatile fraction and identify their chemo-types. The essential oil of Belpharis linariifolia seeds were tested against four standard bacterial species: two Gram-positive bacteria viz, Bacillus subtilis (NCTC 8236) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), two Gram-negative bacterial strains Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), and fungal strains viz, Candida albicans (ATCC 7596) using the paper disc diffusion method. Twenty two components were identified in the essential oil of Belpharis linariifolia representing 82.87% of the total components, the major compounds were Acetic acid (11.60%), 4-acetyl-2-isopropyl-5,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran-2-yl (11.60%), 3-Cyano-2-Oxa-1-Ethoxyadamanane (13.09%), Ethyl 3-methyl-2-oxobutyrate (15.49%), Hexatriacontane (8.18%) and Dotriacontane (16.03%). Antimicrobial activity of essential oil of Belpharis linariifolia dissolved in methanol (1:10), showed low activity against the Gram-negative bacteria (P. aeruginosa & E. coli) (14 & 11 mm). It also showed against Gram positive bacteria (S. aureus & B. subtilis) (11.5 & 14 mm) and against (C. albicans) (zero mm). This study conducted for essential oil of Belpharis linariifolia seeds presence of variable compounds with diverse structures and low antimicrobial activity.
Keywords
in-vitro, FT-IR, Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), Antimicrobial Activity, Essential Oils, Belpharis linariifolia (Seeds)
To cite this article
Noha Ali Ibrahim, Safa Khalid Musa, Shima Mohammed Yassin, Nosiba Hashim Abuniama, Sufyan Awadalkareem, Alsiddig Osama, Mohamed N. Abdalaziz, Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil of Belpharis linariifolia, International Journal of Science, Technology and Society. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2017, pp. 62-66. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsts.20170504.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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