Improving the Health Workforce Distribution in Remote and Rural Areas of Ethiopia: An Evidence-Based Policy Brief
Journal of Investment and Management
Volume 7, Issue 2, April 2018, Pages: 45-52
Received: Jan. 17, 2018; Accepted: Feb. 11, 2018; Published: Apr. 17, 2018
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Authors
Serebe Abay, Technology Transfer and Research Translation Directorate, Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Amanuel Dibaba, Technology Transfer and Research Translation Directorate, Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Yosef Gebreyohannes, Technology Transfer and Research Translation Directorate, Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Desalegn Ararso, Technology Transfer and Research Translation Directorate, Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Fasil Mengistu, Technology Transfer and Research Translation Directorate, Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Mamuye Hadis, Technology Transfer and Research Translation Directorate, Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Human Resources for Health (HRH) constitute the most vital component of health systems. However, the HRH picture of Ethiopia has remained critically low and characterized by geographic mal-distribution. This brief aimed to show the major causes for poor health workforce distribution and to suggest possible policy options. We reviewed relevant evidence describing the problem and feasible options to address the problem, the barriers to implement those options, and implementation strategies to address these barriers. We searched electronic databases of systematic reviews and supplemented with local evidences. In our review, we found different options that help to improve health workforce distribution in the remote and rural areas of the country. Systematic reviews on impact of task shifting, clinical rotations in rural areas during studies and financial incentives have shown favourable results that may lead to increase the number of health workforce working in rural and underserved areas. But none of the studies assessed the costs and cost effectiveness of the suggested options. Therefore, given the limitations of the currently available evidence, there is a need for rigorous evaluative research on the cost effectiveness of each option prior to widespread implementation.
Keywords
Policy Brief, Health Workforce Distribution, Health System, Ethiopia
To cite this article
Serebe Abay, Amanuel Dibaba, Yosef Gebreyohannes, Desalegn Ararso, Fasil Mengistu, Mamuye Hadis, Improving the Health Workforce Distribution in Remote and Rural Areas of Ethiopia: An Evidence-Based Policy Brief, Journal of Investment and Management. Vol. 7, No. 2, 2018, pp. 45-52. doi: 10.11648/j.jim.20180702.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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