Experience Differentiation Strategy (2): Focus on Embodied Cognition and ACT Module
Science Journal of Business and Management
Volume 3, Issue 2-1, March 2015, Pages: 78-82
Received: Apr. 9, 2015; Accepted: Apr. 9, 2015; Published: Apr. 23, 2015
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Authors
Shin’ya Nagasawa, Graduate School of Commerce, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan
Shinich Otsu, Graduate School of Commerce, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan; IBM Japan, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan
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Abstract
In a mature market like recent Japanese economy, “experiential marketing” has received attention as “differentiation strategy.” In this paper, we focus on behavior experiences (ACT Module of SEMs) in terms of “Embodied cognition.” Behavior experiences (ACT Module) are consumer’s behaviors and physiological /psychological effects occurs by consumer’s behaviors. The results shows that there are two points for leading to Behavior experiences (ACT Module), 1) design products that has factors leading to consumers behaviors, 2) design situations that has factors leading to consumers behaviors.
Keywords
Customer Experience, Consumer Experience, Differentiation Strategy, Embodied Cognition, Behavioral Experience
To cite this article
Shin’ya Nagasawa, Shinich Otsu, Experience Differentiation Strategy (2): Focus on Embodied Cognition and ACT Module, Science Journal of Business and Management. Special Issue:Customer Experience Management / Marketing Branding. Vol. 3, No. 2-1, 2015, pp. 78-82. doi: 10.11648/j.sjbm.s.2015030201.21
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