Farmer's Perception Towards Agricultural Technology - The Case of Improved Highland Maize Varieties Adoption in Selected Kebeles of Toke Kutaye District, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia
Journal of World Economic Research
Volume 8, Issue 1, June 2019, Pages: 1-7
Received: Feb. 28, 2019; Accepted: Apr. 9, 2019; Published: Apr. 29, 2019
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Authors
Dawit Milkias, Ambo Agricultural Research Center, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research/EIAR/, Ambo, Ethiopia
Daniel Belay, Department of Rural Development and Agricultural Extension, Institute of Cooperatives and Development Studies, Ambo University, Ambo, Ethiopia
Gemechu Shale Ogato, Department of Rural Development and Agricultural Extension, Institute of Cooperatives and Development Studies, Ambo University, Ambo, Ethiopia
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Abstract
The study aims to reveal farmer’s perceptions towards improved highland maize varieties in selected kebeles of Toke kutaye districts. In this paper, farmer’s perception towards improved highland maize varieties were investigated or measured using a scale with items developed for the purpose of this study. Two stage sampling procedures were followed in order to draw 150 sample respondents. Responses of sample respondents on the perception related were analyzed using Likert type scale. Based on the level of agreements the result revealed that perception on disease resistant, high yielding potential of the varieties, early maturity of the varieties, agro ecological suitability and availability of seed at the right time and quality showed relatively best performance of the varieties in the study area. Whereas, perception on technological availability of the varieties indicates relatively poorest agreement compared to all other characteristics of level of agreements considered. Even if the advantages of the varieties are more for households of the study area, some farmers are discouraged to adopt the variety because of reasons such as demand more inputs, the lack of credit service, market problem, insect pest problem, lack of awareness and extension support on the technology. Therefore, the extension and research system have to look in to these factors to give solution for the adoption of the variety.
Keywords
Highland Maize, Perception, Likert Type Scale, Agreements
To cite this article
Dawit Milkias, Daniel Belay, Gemechu Shale Ogato, Farmer's Perception Towards Agricultural Technology - The Case of Improved Highland Maize Varieties Adoption in Selected Kebeles of Toke Kutaye District, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia, Journal of World Economic Research. Vol. 8, No. 1, 2019, pp. 1-7. doi: 10.11648/j.jwer.20190801.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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