Quantitative Risk Analysis for Gas (NG and NGL) Pipelines
International Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Analysis
Volume 3, Issue 6-1, November 2015, Pages: 1-8
Received: Aug. 8, 2015; Accepted: Aug. 10, 2015; Published: Oct. 16, 2015
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Author
Huseyin Murat Cekirge, Department of Mechanical Engineering, the Grove School of Engineering, the City College of the City University of New York, New York, USA
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Abstract
By using index method and multivariable analysis, a methodology of the threat and risk of natural gas (NG) and natural gas liquids (NGL) pipelines to environment will be presented by considering total infrastructure. General concepts are introduced and explained in detail.
Keywords
Quantitative Risk Analysis, Risk Valorization, Risk Analysis of NG Pipelines, Risk Analysis of NGL Pipelines, Acceptable Risk Zones, Unacceptable Risk Zones
To cite this article
Huseyin Murat Cekirge, Quantitative Risk Analysis for Gas (NG and NGL) Pipelines, International Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Analysis. Special Issue: Environmental Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) and Risk Assessment of Crude Oil and Gas Pipelines. Vol. 3, No. 6-1, 2015, pp. 1-8. doi: 10.11648/j.ijema.s.2015030601.11
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