Cholesterol and Triglyceride Levels in Patients with Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease at Campus Teaching Hospital of Lomé (Togo)
Science Journal of Clinical Medicine
Volume 5, Issue 2, March 2016, Pages: 24-28
Received: Mar. 5, 2016; Accepted: Mar. 11, 2016; Published: Mar. 24, 2016
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Authors
Padaro Essohana, Hematology, Campus Teaching Hospital of Lome, Lome, Togo; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lome, Lome, Togo
Kueviakoe Irenee Messanh Delagnon, Hematology, Campus Teaching Hospital of Lome, Lome, Togo; Hematology, Sylvanus Olympio Teaching Hospital of Lome, Lome, Togo; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lome, Lome, Togo
Feteke Lochina, National Blood Transfusion Centre, Lome, Togo; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lome, Lome, Togo
Magnang Hezouwe, Hematology, Campus Teaching Hospital of Lome, Lome, Togo; National Blood Transfusion Centre, Lome, Togo; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lome, Lome, Togo
Mawussi Koffi, National Blood Transfusion Centre, Lome, Togo; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lome, Lome, Togo
Layibo Yao, Hematology, Campus Teaching Hospital of Lome, Lome, Togo; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lome, Lome, Togo
Dovi Eteh Isac, Hematology, Campus Teaching Hospital of Lome, Lome, Togo
Segbena Akuete Yvon, Hematology, Campus Teaching Hospital of Lome, Lome, Togo; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lome, Lome, Togo
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Abstract
Determine cholesterol and triglyceride levels in patients with homozygous SS sickle cell during intercritical stage and study the influence of vaso-occlusive crisis on their rates. It was a case - control study during 6 month: one group of 70 homozygous SS sickle cell and a second group of 70 apparently healthy controls with normal hemoglobin AA. The average age of patients with sickle cell is 16, 22 ± 10.44 years (range 1 year and 40 years) against 28, 91 ± 15, 81 years (range 2 years and 66 years) for the controls. There was a male predominance in sickle cell disease (sex ratio = 1.41) while it was 0.94 for the controls. In the group of patients, about cholesterol, 47 (67.14%) had a low rate, 20 (28.57%) normal rate and 3 (4.29%) a high rate. For control, 24 (34.29%) had a low rate, 25 (35.71%) had at normal rate and 21 (30%) high rate. For HDL cholesterol, among sickle cell, 51 (72.86%) had a low rate, 16 (22.86%) a normal rate and 3 (4.28%) a high rate against respectively 43 (61.43%), 22 (31.43%) and 5 (7.14%) for controls. The calculation of the value of LDL cholesterol showed that for sickle cell disease, 68 (97.14%) had a low rate, 2 (2.86%) against a high rate respectively 49 (70%) and 21 (30%) for witnesses. Triglycerides dosing showed that among the sickle, 5 (7.14%) had a low rate, 56 (80%) normal rate and 9 (12, 86%) a high against respectively 5 (7.14%), 57 (81.42%) and 8 (11.42%) for controls. Analytically, total cholesterol and its derivatives was significantly lower in patients compared to controls. But the difference is not significant at triglycerides level between the two groups. During the study period, 19 patients with sickle cell disease (29.14%) had at least one pain crisis. The comparison of the value of different lipid fractions shows that there is no significant difference whether patients had or not crisis during the study period. There was a significant decrease in total cholesterol and its fractions (HDL and LDL) in homozygous SS sickle cell. The vaso-occlusive crisis does not affect these lipid parameters. We recommend to complete this preliminary study by a realization on a larger scale, by identifying lipid peroxidation markers of oxidative stress.
Keywords
Sickle Cell Anemia, Cholesterol and Fractions, Triglycerides
To cite this article
Padaro Essohana, Kueviakoe Irenee Messanh Delagnon, Feteke Lochina, Magnang Hezouwe, Mawussi Koffi, Layibo Yao, Dovi Eteh Isac, Segbena Akuete Yvon, Cholesterol and Triglyceride Levels in Patients with Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease at Campus Teaching Hospital of Lomé (Togo), Science Journal of Clinical Medicine. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2016, pp. 24-28. doi: 10.11648/j.sjcm.20160502.13
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This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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