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Study on the Physicochemical and Antioxidant Properties of Nigella Honey
International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Volume 4, Issue 2, March 2015, Pages: 137-140
Received: Jan. 18, 2015; Accepted: Feb. 15, 2015; Published: Mar. 2, 2015
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Authors
Khan Md. Murtaja Reza Linkon, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University (MBSTU), Santosh, Tangail, Bangladesh
Utpal Kumar Prodhan, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University (MBSTU), Santosh, Tangail, Bangladesh
Md. Abdul Hakim, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University (MBSTU), Santosh, Tangail, Bangladesh
Md. Abdul Alim, Department of Food Technology and Nutritional Science, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University (MBSTU), Santosh, Tangail, Bangladesh
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Abstract
Honey is a remarkable complex natural liquid and rich in phenolic compounds, which act as natural antioxidants and are becoming increasingly popular because of their potential role in contributing to human health. The intent of the current study was to characterize the physical, chemical, biochemical and antioxidant properties of the Nigella honey sample. The physicochemical glimpse, such as moisture, pH, Total Soluble Solid (TSS), protein, ash, total carbohydrate, energy, Thermal Effect of Food (TEF), minerals and heavy metal content were measured applying various laboratory and mathematical techniques. Several biochemical and antioxidant tests were done to determine the antioxidant properties of Nigella honey sample. The mean moisture content was 14.331±0.377 %, pH content was 4.78, Total Soluble Solid (TSS) content was 73 %, protein content was 0.985 %, mean ash content was 0.188±0.071 %, total carbohydrate content was 84.496 %, energy content was 350.4721 Kcal/100 g, Thermal Effect of Food (TEF) content was 35.05 Kcal/100 g and the minerals and heavy metal content named Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe and Pb were 558 ppm, 1063.774 ppm, 75.4 ppm, 58.8471 ppm, 344.2112 ppm and 5.6 ppm respectively. The antioxidant glimpse, such as polyphenol content was 95.5± 0.0052 mg Gallic acid/ 50 ml, flavonoid content was 2.66 ± 0.000577 mg catechin/ 50 ml and vitamin C content was 0.69mg/100ml, were detected, indicating that Nigella honey contributes a high antioxidant potential. Thus, the study revealed that Nigella honey is a good source of antioxidants.
Keywords
Nigella Honey, Antioxidant, Heavy Metal, Phenolic Compounds
To cite this article
Khan Md. Murtaja Reza Linkon, Utpal Kumar Prodhan, Md. Abdul Hakim, Md. Abdul Alim, Study on the Physicochemical and Antioxidant Properties of Nigella Honey, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2015, pp. 137-140. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20150402.13
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