Assessment of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Disaster Preparedness among Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital Health Care Workers, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
American Journal of Nursing Science
Volume 7, Issue 1, February 2018, Pages: 39-48
Received: Jan. 4, 2016; Accepted: Jan. 20, 2016; Published: Jan. 31, 2018
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Authors
Ashenafi Habte, Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Adamu Addisie, Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Aklilu Azazh, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Back ground: Disasters are parts of human life; they will never ask for permission to occur in particular area. The world over, they have been caused disastrous complications, disrupting human lives, and exposing the world economy to untold cost. In times of disasters, hospitals are among the most crucial institutions as they are considered as sanctuaries where victims seek ministration. Although major disasters are always to be expected, past disasters and more recent events shows that communities are not yet fully prepared. Objective: The study was intended to assess current awareness, attitude, and practice of the health care workers regarding disaster preparedness and to find out what arrangements were in place should a disaster occur at the hospital. Methodology: The study utilized both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Data collection was made through self-administered questionnaires and semi- structured key informant interview. A total of 290 respondents were participated in the study. Data analysis: Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics with Epi-info and Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). Qualitative data were analyzed after organizing into themes and summaries. Result: About half of (50.8%) health care workers had good knowledge about hospital disaster preparedness and its plan. The remaining 49.2%) had low knowledge. Their general attitude towards the issue was largely positive as 64.8% of respondents had favorable attitude. Low practice (8.3%) of disaster preparedness at the hospital was observed. Moreover, the hospital had neither nor disaster preparedness plan nor other forms of arrangements and preparations for occurrence of disasters. Conclusion and recommendations: The present study found that the health care workers at the hospital had fair awareness and largely positive attitude on disaster preparedness. As the national health policy has not given sufficient attention to hospitals disaster preparedness, there were negligible arrangements in place at the hospital. Therefore, much effort is still expected from all stakeholders including Federal Ministry of Health and managements of hospital.
Keywords
Emergencies, Disaster Preparedness, Disaster Preparedness Plan
To cite this article
Ashenafi Habte, Adamu Addisie, Aklilu Azazh, Assessment of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Disaster Preparedness among Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital Health Care Workers, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, American Journal of Nursing Science. Vol. 7, No. 1, 2018, pp. 39-48. doi: 10.11648/j.ajns.20180701.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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