Standardized Bowel Training Benefits Patients with Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction After Spinal Cord Injury
American Journal of Nursing Science
Volume 4, Issue 6, December 2015, Pages: 305-307
Received: Oct. 13, 2015; Accepted: Oct. 26, 2015; Published: Nov. 19, 2015
Views 3437      Downloads 87
Authors
Cuiqing Liu, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Lihuan Hou, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Hong Zhang, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
In order to evaluate the effect of standardized management on spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic bowel dysfunction, 50 cases of spinal cord injury patients from January 2011 to December 2013 were treated with neurogenic bowel intestinal standardized management. The effect was compared to that with routine nursing of 32 spinal cord injury patients from January 2009 to December 2010. Data analysis regarding the age, spinal cord injury, neurological movement and basic sensory score showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). However, bowel functional indexes including abdominal distension, abdominal pain, evacuation time and anal incontinence of the standardized training group decreased as compared to those of control group (P < 0.05). The bowel way of the standardized training patients was also in line with normal living habits, including fixed time and the toilet bowel movement. In conclusion, standardization bowel management intervention is beneficial to the patients with spinal cord injury to form regular bowel habit.
Keywords
Spinal Cord Injury, Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction, Standardized Bowel Training
To cite this article
Cuiqing Liu, Lihuan Hou, Hong Zhang, Standardized Bowel Training Benefits Patients with Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction After Spinal Cord Injury, American Journal of Nursing Science. Vol. 4, No. 6, 2015, pp. 305-307. doi: 10.11648/j.ajns.20150406.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
Lynch, A.C., et al., Bowel dysfunction following spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord, 2001. 39(4): p. 193-203.
[2]
Noonan, V.K., et al., Impact of associated conditions resulting from spinal cord injury on health status and quality of life in people with traumatic central cord syndrome. Arch Phys Med Rehabil, 2008. 89(6): p. 1074-82.
[3]
Glickman, S. and M.A. Kamm, Bowel dysfunction in spinal-cord-injury patients. Lancet, 1996. 347(9016): p. 1651-3.
[4]
Kirshblum, S.C., et al., Bowel care practices in chronic spinal cord injury patients. Arch Phys Med Rehabil, 1998. 79(1): p. 20-3.
[5]
Lynch, A.C., et al., Bowel dysfunction following spinal cord injury: a description of bowel function in a spinal cord-injured population and comparison with age and gender matched controls. Spinal Cord, 2000. 38(12): p. 717-23.
[6]
Harari, D., et al., Constipation-related symptoms and bowel program concerning individuals with spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord, 1997. 35(6): p. 394-401.
[7]
Coggrave, M.J. and C. Norton, The need for manual evacuation and oral laxatives in the management of neurogenic bowel dysfunction after spinal cord injury: a randomized controlled trial of a stepwise protocol. Spinal Cord, 2010. 48(6): p. 504-10.
[8]
Stiens, S.A., S.B. Bergman, and L.L. Goetz, Neurogenic bowel dysfunction after spinal cord injury: clinical evaluation and rehabilitative management. Arch Phys Med Rehabil, 1997. 78(3 Suppl): p. S86-102.
[9]
Kennedy, P., et al., Psychological contributions to functional independence: a longitudinal investigation of spinal cord injury rehabilitation. Arch Phys Med Rehabil, 2011. 92(4): p. 597-602.
[10]
Fynne, L., et al., Gastric and small intestinal dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients. Acta Neurol Scand, 2012. 125(2): p. 123-8.
[11]
Tornblom, H., et al., Colonic transit time and IBS symptoms: what's the link? Am J Gastroenterol, 2012, 107(5): p. 754-60.
[12]
Lynch, A.C., et al., Anorectal physiology following spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord, 2000. 38(10): p. 573-80.
[13]
Committee, M., et al., International standards for neurological classification of spinal cord injury, revised 2011. Top Spinal Cord Inj Rehabil, 2012. 18(1): p. 85-99.
[14]
Guo, J.D., et al., Genetic ablation of receptor for advanced glycation end products promotes functional recovery in mouse model of spinal cord injury. Mol Cell Biochem, 2014. 390(1-2): p. 215-23.
[15]
Liu, C.W., et al., Relationship between neurogenic bowel dysfunction and health-related quality of life in persons with spinal cord injury. J Rehabil Med, 2009. 41(1): p. 35-40.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186