Detecting Undernutrition on Hospital Admission - Screening Tool Versus WHO Criteria
Clinical Medicine Research
Volume 6, Issue 3, May 2017, Pages: 74-79
Received: Jan. 27, 2017; Accepted: Mar. 14, 2017; Published: Apr. 10, 2017
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Authors
Zrinka Matak, Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia
Duska Tjesic-Drinkovic, Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia; Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Centre Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
Lana Omerza, Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Centre Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
Irena Senecic-Cala, Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia; Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Centre Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
Jurica Vukovic, Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia; Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Centre Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
Dorian Tjesic-Drinkovic, Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia; Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Centre Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
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Abstract
To prevent the development of malnutrition in hospitalized children, it is important to develope an early identification of nutritional depletion, ideally at the time of admission to the hospital. In 2009 Hulst et al. proposed new guidelines for assessing the nutritional status of hospitalized children called STRONGkids questionnaire (Screening Tool Risk on Nutritional Status and Growth). This study was designed to describe the current prevalence of malnutrition on admission to a pediatric gastroenterology hospital unit and to compare the value and feasibility of STRONGkids scoring system versus anthropometric World Health Organization (WHO) criteria in identifying children at risk of developing malnutrition during hospital stay. The prospective observational study involved 124 children hospitalized at the Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Center Zagreb. Nutritional status and risk for malnutrition were estimated by STRONGkids questionnaire and anthropometric measurements of subjects. Statistical analysis was performed using the computer program STATISTICS 10, StatSoft. Inc. 1984-2011; using descriptive statistics, Fisher's exact (FE) test and non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis (KW) test. Total malnutrition was observed in 18.5% of patients. Larger number of children at risk for malnutrition were identified by STRONGkids questionnaire than by anthropometric measurements (STRONGkids questionnaire: 75.8%; anthropometric measures: 40.3%). Patients that lost weight during hospitalization (33.1%) were further analyzed: 8/41 were not detected to be at risk by either method, 11/41 were identified by STRONGkids and anthropometry, and 22/41 were detected only by STRONGkids (Fisher's exact test p=0,08). This study justifies the inclusion of the STRONGkids questionnaire in the initial evaluation of children on admission to the hospital, in order to recognize those who need special nutritional support and thus prevent the development of malnutrition during hospitalization.
Keywords
Nutritional Status, Hospitalized Children, Malnutrition, STRONGkids, Screening Tool, Anthropometry
To cite this article
Zrinka Matak, Duska Tjesic-Drinkovic, Lana Omerza, Irena Senecic-Cala, Jurica Vukovic, Dorian Tjesic-Drinkovic, Detecting Undernutrition on Hospital Admission - Screening Tool Versus WHO Criteria, Clinical Medicine Research. Vol. 6, No. 3, 2017, pp. 74-79. doi: 10.11648/j.cmr.20170603.13
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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