Computation of 10 Knife Edge Diffraction Loss Using Epstein-Peterson Method
American Journal of Software Engineering and Applications
Volume 6, Issue 1, February 2017, Pages: 1-4
Received: Jan. 3, 2017; Accepted: Jan. 10, 2017; Published: Feb. 3, 2017
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Authors
Wali Samuel, Department of Electrical/Electronic and Computer Engineering, University of Uyo, Uyo, Nigeria
Trust Christopher Oguichen, Department of Electrical/Computer Engineering, Port Harcourt Polytechnic, Rumuola, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
Steve Worgu, Department of Electrical/Computer Engineering, Port Harcourt Polytechnic, Rumuola, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
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Abstract
In this paper, application of Epstein-Peterson method in the computation of a ten (10) multiple knife edge diffraction loss is presented for a 1 GHz microwave link. In the computation, each of the ten obstructions gave rise to a virtual hop which resulted in a knife edge diffraction loss. What is peculiar to the Epstein-Peterson method is how the virtual hops are identified or defined. The overall diffraction loss, according to the Epstein-Peterson method is the sum of the diffraction loss computed for each of the ten virtual hops. In the results, the highest LOS clearance height of 5.727273 m occurred in virtual hop 5 whereas the highest diffraction parameter of 0.333333 and the highest virtual hop diffraction loss of 8.908754dB occurred in virtual hop1. The lowest LOS clearance height of 0.4 m, the lowest diffraction parameter 0.029814 and the lowest virtual hop diffraction loss, 6.290874 dB occurred in virtual hop 9. In all, the overall effective diffraction loss for the 10 knife edge obstructions as computed by the Epstein-Peterson is 69.93384 dB.
Keywords
Multiple Knife Edge, Diffraction Loss, Diffraction Parameter, Line of Sight, Clearance Height, Virtual Hop, Epstein-Peterson Method
To cite this article
Wali Samuel, Trust Christopher Oguichen, Steve Worgu, Computation of 10 Knife Edge Diffraction Loss Using Epstein-Peterson Method, American Journal of Software Engineering and Applications. Vol. 6, No. 1, 2017, pp. 1-4. doi: 10.11648/j.ajsea.20170601.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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