Characterization of Electrochemical Cycling-Induced New Products of NaCuO2 Cathode Material for Sodium Secondary Batteries
American Journal of Physical Chemistry
Volume 3, Issue 5, October 2014, Pages: 61-66
Received: Sep. 17, 2014; Accepted: Oct. 5, 2014; Published: Oct. 30, 2014
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Authors
Yoko Ono, Energy and Environment Systems Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Kanagawa 243-0198, Japan; Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192, Japan
Yuhki Yui, Energy and Environment Systems Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Kanagawa 243-0198, Japan
Kaoru Asakura, Energy and Environment Systems Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Kanagawa 243-0198, Japan
Jiro Nakamura, Energy and Environment Systems Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Kanagawa 243-0198, Japan
Masahiko Hayashi, Energy and Environment Systems Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Kanagawa 243-0198, Japan; Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192, Japan
Kazue Ichino Takahashi, Energy and Environment Systems Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Kanagawa 243-0198, Japan; Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192, Japan
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Abstract
Using a Na/NaCuO2 cell, we investigate the conversion of NaCuO2 during charge and discharge reactions and the new products formed by the conversion. In the voltage range of 0.75 to 3.0 V, the results of ex-situ XRD analysis indicate that Na2CuO2, an unstable amorphous discharge product, converted into CuO and Cu2O. Moreover, an XPS analysis reveals Na2O is formed on the surface of a NaCuO2 electrode. From 1.7 to 4.2 V, on the other hand, the first charge product, Na1-xCuO2, should partially form CuO. This behavior is similar to the reaction in which the charge of a Li/LiCuO2 cell forms CuO. Then, after the discharge, CuO and Cu2O are observed as the main components in XRD patterns of the electrode. NaCuO2 phase appeared again after the subsequent charge. NaCuO2 is gradually converted into CuO as the main component as the cycles proceed. The cycling-induced new products of NaCuO2 change, depends on the voltage ranges.
Keywords
XRD Analysis, Sodium Copper Oxide, Metal Oxide Cathode, Sodium-Ion Batteries
To cite this article
Yoko Ono, Yuhki Yui, Kaoru Asakura, Jiro Nakamura, Masahiko Hayashi, Kazue Ichino Takahashi, Characterization of Electrochemical Cycling-Induced New Products of NaCuO2 Cathode Material for Sodium Secondary Batteries, American Journal of Physical Chemistry. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2014, pp. 61-66. doi: 10.11648/j.ajpc.20140305.12
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