Key Informant Perceptions on the Invasive Ipomoea Plant Species in Kajiado County, South Eastern Kenya
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 4, Issue 4, August 2015, Pages: 195-199
Received: Jul. 27, 2015; Accepted: Aug. 5, 2015; Published: Aug. 19, 2015
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Authors
Kidake K. Bosco, Arid and Range Lands Research Institute-Kiboko, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization, Makindu, Kenya
Manyeki K. John, Arid and Range Lands Research Institute-Kiboko, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization, Makindu, Kenya
Kirwa C. Everlyne, Arid and Range Lands Research Institute-Kiboko, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization, Makindu, Kenya
Ngetich Robert, Arid and Range Lands Research Institute-Kiboko, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization, Makindu, Kenya
Nenkari Halima, Agricultural Sector Development Support Program, Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries, Kajiado County, Kajiado, Kenya
Mnene N. William, Arid and Range Lands Research Institute-Kiboko, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization, Makindu, Kenya
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Abstract
Invasion of rangelands by undesirable plant species is one of the challenges facing rangeland productivity and to an extension livestock production in East Africa. They have affected communities in different ways in areas where they grow. Focus group discussions and interviews were held in two sites in pastoral and agro-pastoral regions of Kajiado County to get perceptions of farmers, livestock keepers and other stakeholders concerning the invasive plant species Ipomoea. This was accompanied by visits and field excursions to areas heavily infested by the invader species. The interviewed key informants agreed that the plant has more detrimental effects to the environment, ecologically and to the economy of the region. There is need for urgent interventions involving all stakeholders to curb the spread of the species, which is currently at an unprecedented rate. These include efforts by relevant institutions such as Government, Non-Governmental institutions through mobilization, training and capacity building and demonstrations in order to reverse the trend. Any trainings should however include aspects of recovery of invaded and degraded land primarily through pasture improvement and other interventions as this will enhance the utilization of these areas for increased livestock productivity and reverse degradation
Keywords
Invasion, Ipomoea, Rangelands, Semi-Arid Lands
To cite this article
Kidake K. Bosco, Manyeki K. John, Kirwa C. Everlyne, Ngetich Robert, Nenkari Halima, Mnene N. William, Key Informant Perceptions on the Invasive Ipomoea Plant Species in Kajiado County, South Eastern Kenya, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Vol. 4, No. 4, 2015, pp. 195-199. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20150404.17
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