Sperm Supply from the Testes to the Seminal Vesicle over Consecutive Matings in the Sweetpotato Weevil, Cylas formicarius (FABRICIUS) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)
American Journal of Life Sciences
Volume 5, Issue 4, August 2017, Pages: 103-107
Received: Jun. 6, 2017; Accepted: Jun. 21, 2017; Published: Jul. 18, 2017
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Authors
Satoshi Hiroyoshi, Okinawa Prefectural Fruit-fly Eradication Program Office (Currently Okinawa Prefectural Plant Protection Center), Okinawa, Japan; Okinawa Prefectural Agricultural Research Center, Itoman, Okinawa, Japan; Nishikawacho, Itoman, Okinawa, Japan
Gadi V. P. Reddy, Montana State University, Western Triangle Agrcultural Research Center, Conrad, USA
Tsuguo Kohama, Okinawa Prefectural Fruit-fly Eradication Program Office (Currently Okinawa Prefectural Plant Protection Center), Okinawa, Japan; Okinawa Prefectural Agricultural Research Center, Itoman, Okinawa, Japan
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Abstract
The sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius, stores free sperm in both the testes and the seminal vesicle, even though the primary function of the testes is sperm production. Here, it was investigated sperm storage in the testes in relation to mating frequency. In particular, it was examined the effect of the positional relationship between the testes and seminal vesicle, on sperm storage by counting the number of sperm in those organs. After mating, not only were the number of free sperm in the seminal vesicle reduced, but also was the number in the testes, suggesting that free sperm stored in the testes moved into the seminal vesicle during or immediately after mating. Since this weevil seems to not regulate the number of sperm in the seminal vesicle for ejaculation, the sperm supply system of the testes may contribute ejaculate to support consecutive, multiple matings by this weevil.
Keywords
Insemination, Ipomoea batatas, Reproduction, Spermatogenesis, Sperm Supply System, Sweet Potato
To cite this article
Satoshi Hiroyoshi, Gadi V. P. Reddy, Tsuguo Kohama, Sperm Supply from the Testes to the Seminal Vesicle over Consecutive Matings in the Sweetpotato Weevil, Cylas formicarius (FABRICIUS) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), American Journal of Life Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2017, pp. 103-107. doi: 10.11648/j.ajls.20170504.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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