Attractant Role of Bacterial Bioluminescence of Photorhabdusluminescenson a Galleria mellonella Model
American Journal of Life Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 4, August 2015, Pages: 290-294
Received: Jun. 16, 2015; Accepted: Jun. 25, 2015; Published: Jul. 8, 2015
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Authors
Walter Patterson, Sartorius Stedim Biotechnology Laboratory, Biotechnology Research and Training Center, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, Pembroke, USA
Devang Upadhyay, Sartorius Stedim Biotechnology Laboratory, Biotechnology Research and Training Center, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, Pembroke, USA
Sivanadane Mandjiny, Department of Chemistry and Physics, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, Pembroke, USA
Rebecca Bullard-Dillard, School of Graduate Studies and Research, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, Pembroke, USA
Meredith Storms, College of Arts & Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, Pembroke, USA
Michael Menefee, Thomas Family Center for Entrepreneurship, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, Pembroke, USA
Leonard D. Holmes, Sartorius Stedim Biotechnology Laboratory, Biotechnology Research and Training Center, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, Pembroke, USA
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Abstract
Though the intricate relationship between the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and its symbiotic bacterial counterpart Photorhabdus luminescensis generally known; the role of bioluminescence produced by the bacterial symbiont is yet to be identified. The objective of this study was to determine if bacterial luminosity plays a crucial role in attraction of larval insect hosts. This study focused on bacterial bioluminescence produced from both in vitro and in vivo culturing of the bacterial symbiont. The obtained results portrays that the average distance between Galleria mellonellalarvae and the bacterial light source (P. luminescens)decreased in a linear fashion as a function of increasing intensities of luminosity; thereby supporting the hypothesis that bioluminescence offers a symbiotic role to attract insect host larvae.
Keywords
Photorhabdus Luminescens, Heterorhabditis Bacteriophora, Symbiosis, Bioluminescence, Biological Control Agent
To cite this article
Walter Patterson, Devang Upadhyay, Sivanadane Mandjiny, Rebecca Bullard-Dillard, Meredith Storms, Michael Menefee, Leonard D. Holmes, Attractant Role of Bacterial Bioluminescence of Photorhabdusluminescenson a Galleria mellonella Model, American Journal of Life Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2015, pp. 290-294. doi: 10.11648/j.ajls.20150304.16
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